Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Balder Onarheim and Morten Friis-Olivarius

This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching “applied creativity” and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied NeuroCreativity (ANC) program, taught at business schools in Denmark and Canada.

Thinking for a Living: How to Get Better Performance and Results from Knowledge Workers

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mood, Creative Environment

Author: Thomas H. Davenport

One factor that affects knowledge worker performance that isn’t well understood is the physical work environment—the offices, cubicles, buildings, and mobile workplaces in which knowledge workers do their jobs. There is a good deal said about this topic, but not much known about it. Even more unfortunately, most decisions about the knowledge work environment are made without seriously considering their implications for performance.

Creative Feelings: The Effect of Mood on Creative Ideation and Evaluation

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mood

Authors: Paul T. Sowden and Leah Dawson

Research has found mixed effects of mood on creative problem solving. Here we examined the effects of mood on two components of creative problem solving; ideation and evaluation. After induction of positive, negative or neutral mood participants completed ideation and evaluation tasks. Results showed that a positive mood facilitates ideation whereas a negative mood facilitated evaluation.

Effects of Positive Mood on Generative and Evaluative Thinking in Creative Problem Solving

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mood

Authors: Jennifer Politis and John C. Houtz

The goal of this study was to examine the role of positive mood on generative and evaluative thinking in creative problem solving. Participants included 89 middle school students who watched either a positive or neutral mood video program. After students watched the video, they completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) scale to determine their current mood.