The Agile Innovation Framework

Posted Posted in Research, English

Author: Frank Schultheiss

The Agile Innovation Framework is a system for the structured development of innovations. The goal of the innovations discussed here is always market success and exploitation. Since about 85% of innovation activities are repetitive, some structure to innovation is clearly required. A well defined and implemented innovation process provides this basic structure or framework for establishing an innovation capability within an enterprise (Du Preez et al., 2006).

Kanban Maturity Model (KMM)

Posted Posted in Research, English

Author: Frank Schultheiss

Translating the Kanban Maturity Model with “Maturity Model” would be pretty much understatement. It is much more than that: a reference model. In fact, it’s a framework that makes organizations more agile and adaptable. It provides a roadmap that gradually enhances the evolutionary capacity of organizations, ensuring long-term survival.

Sixth generation innovation model: description of a success model

Posted Posted in Research, English

José Carlos Barbieri, Antonio Carlos, Teixeira Álvares

The purpose of this paper is to present an innovation model to enable implementation of a policy of innovation on a continuous basis. Literature has presented a range of innovation models that reflects its growing importance to countries and organizations, especially business enterprises. An innovation model comprises a group of principles, regulations, routines and practices that guide innovation processes. In specialist literature, the models refer to technological product and process innovations; using the Oslo Manual classifications organizational and marketing innovations are disregarded.

Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Balder Onarheim and Morten Friis-Olivarius

This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching “applied creativity” and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied NeuroCreativity (ANC) program, taught at business schools in Denmark and Canada.

Improving creativity performance by short-term meditation

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mindfulness

Authors: Ding, X., Tang, Y.-Y., Tang, R., & Posner, M. I.

One form of meditation intervention, the integrative body-mind training (IBMT) has been shown to improve attention, reduce stress and change self-reports of mood. In this paper we examine whether short-term IBMT can improve performance related to creativity and determine the role that mood may play in such improvement.

Mind wandering “Ahas” versus mindful reasoning: alternative routes to creative solutions

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mindfulness

Authors: Claire M. Zedelius and Jonathan W. Schooler

Based on mixed results linking both mindfulness and its opposing construct mind wandering to enhanced creativity, we predicted that the relationship between mindfulness and creativity might depend on whether creative problems are approached through analytic strategy or through “insight” (i.e., sudden awareness of a solution).

Cognition About the Creative Process – Interview With Dr. Andrew P. Allen

Posted Posted in Research, English

Author: Andrew P. Allen, Lynda Loughnane

What is the relationship between the creative process and cognition and perception? Lynda Loughnane, a master’s student in Art and Process in Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork, Ireland interviewed Dr. Andrew P. Allen about the subject. Areas covered include mindfulness, Type 1 and Type 2 thinking, stage theories of creativity, engagement with the art process and the artwork, phenomenology and consciousness with and without self report. The interview was constructed to cover a wide range of subject matter, so as to gather as much information as possible in layman’s language about the cognitive process in relation to creativity and interaction with art.

Mindful creativity: the influence of mindfulness meditation on creative thinking

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mindfulness

Authors: Capurso, V., Fabbro, F., & Crescentini, C.

A new research line investigates the effects of mindfulness-meditation (MM) on creativity. In the first of these studies, creative thinking was compared with logic thinking, examining insight and non-insight problem solving, in individuals with different levels of dispositional mindfulness or undergoing brief MM trainings and a specific positive influence of MM on insight problem-solving was found.

Meditate to create: the impact of focused-attention and open-monitoring training on convergent and divergent thinking

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mindfulness

Authors: Lorenza S. Colzato, Ayca Ozturk and Bernhard Hommel

The practice of meditation has seen a tremendous increase in the western world since the 60s. Scientific interest in meditation has also significantly grown in the past years; however, so far, it has neglected the idea that different type of meditations may drive specific cognitive-control states. In this study we investigate the possible impact of meditation based on focused-attention (FA) and meditation based on open-monitoring (OM) on creativity tasks tapping into convergent and divergent thinking. We show that FA meditation and OM meditation exert specific effect on creativity.

The Motivation for Creativity in Organizations

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Innovation

Author: Teresa M. Amabile

People will be most creative when they feel motivated primarily by the interest, enjoyment, satisfaction, and challenge of the work itself – when they are driven by a deep involvement in their work and a passion for it. This note describes the ways in which creativity can be stimulated by this intrinsic motivation, and by certain forms of extrinsic motivation, such as rewards that signal competence or support future achievement. Managerial implications are discussed.

Enhancing Creativity – First Step to Innovation

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Innovation

Author: Elisabeta Butoi

Enhancing creativity within each organization member involves understanding of what creativity is, how it relates to physical, psychological and social influences and to understand how creativity happens. Creativity has its stages and factors required to release the innovative idea. As every innovation process starts with an idea, understanding what influences the mind and how the idea appears is crucial for individual and organizational performance.

Thinking for a Living: How to Get Better Performance and Results from Knowledge Workers

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Mood, Creative Environment

Author: Thomas H. Davenport

One factor that affects knowledge worker performance that isn’t well understood is the physical work environment—the offices, cubicles, buildings, and mobile workplaces in which knowledge workers do their jobs. There is a good deal said about this topic, but not much known about it. Even more unfortunately, most decisions about the knowledge work environment are made without seriously considering their implications for performance.

Physical Environments Conducive To Creativity and Collaboration Within the Work Environment

Posted Posted in Research, English, Creative Environment

Author: Molly Elizabeth Bryant

With the increase of design thinking strategies and the addition of “innovation teams” within businesses, the demand for the physical workspace to enhance these strategies and structures is growing. Knowledge workers, also known as “the creative class” by Richard Florida, “are the source of original and potentially useful ideas and solutions for a firm’s renewal of products, services, and processes”.

The Efficacy of Teaching Creativity: Assessment of Student Creative Thinking Before and After Exercises

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Autors: Elena Karpova, Sara B. Marcketti, Jessica Barker

The purpose of this research was to assess effectiveness of creativity training by measuring student creative thinking before and after implementation of creativity exercises. The exercises were a systematic approach designed to help students experience and practice non-traditional ways of thinking to identify opportunities, to create, to evaluate, and to promote their ideas.