The Influences of Emotion on Learning and Memory

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Emotion has a substantial influence on the cognitive processes in humans, including perception, attention, learning, memory, reasoning, and problem solving. Emotion has a particularly strong influence on attention, especially modulating the selectivity of attention as well as motivating action and behavior. This attentional and executive control is intimately linked to learning processes, as intrinsically limited attentional capacities are better focused on relevant information.

Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Balder Onarheim and Morten Friis-Olivarius

This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching “applied creativity” and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied NeuroCreativity (ANC) program, taught at business schools in Denmark and Canada.

The Efficacy of Teaching Creativity: Assessment of Student Creative Thinking Before and After Exercises

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training, English

Autors: Elena Karpova, Sara B. Marcketti, Jessica Barker

The purpose of this research was to assess effectiveness of creativity training by measuring student creative thinking before and after implementation of creativity exercises. The exercises were a systematic approach designed to help students experience and practice non-traditional ways of thinking to identify opportunities, to create, to evaluate, and to promote their ideas.

Creativity in the Wild: Improving Creative Reasoning through Immersion in Natural Settings

Posted Posted in Research, Creativity Training

Authors: Ruth Ann Atchley, David L. Strayer and Paul Atchley

Our environment plays a critical role in how we think and behave. The modern environment experienced by most individuals living in urban or suburban settings can be characterized by a dramatic decrease in our exposure to natural settings and a correlated increase in exposure to a technology intense environment.